June 30, 2016

IPC FAQ

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1. Exposure to blood-borne diseases

1.1. General information on exposure to blood, tissue, or other potentially infectious bodily fluid
1.1.1. Health care workers risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens
The risk of exposure to blood and blood-borne pathogens is slightly greater for health care personnel than for people who do not work around blood. An exposure to infected blood, tissue, or other potentially infectious body fluids can occur by: Percutaneous injury (e.g. a needle-stick or cut with a sharp object) OR Contact with mucous membrane or non-intact skin (e.g. skin that is chapped, abraded, or affected by dermatitis).


1.1.2. What does the risk of infection after an exposure depends?
After percutaneous injury, the risk of infection varies for specific bloodborne pathogens:
a. Hepatitis B virus (HBV):
If the source patient is Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive AND Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive, the risk of Hepatitis B transmission is approximately 37%-62%.

If the source patient is HBsAg-positive and HBeAg-negative, the risk of Hepatitis B transmission is approximately 23%- 37%.
b. If the source patient has Hepatitis C (HCV), the risk of Hepatitis C transmission is approximately 1.8% (range 0%-7%).):
c. If the source patient has HIV infection, the risk of HIV transmission is approximately 0.3% after a percutaneous exposure, and 0.09% after a     mucous membrane exposure.
The risk of infection appears to be higher with:

  • Exposure to a larger quantity of blood or other infectious fluid.
  • Prolonged or extensive exposure of non-intact skin or mucous membrane to blood or other infectious fluid or concentrated virus in a laboratory setting.
  • Exposure to the blood of a patient in an advanced disease stage or with a high viral load.
  • A deep percutaneous injury.
  • An injury with a hollow-bore, blood-filled needle.


1.1.3. What to do after an exposure?
Step 1: Treat Exposure Site
Step 2: Report and document
Step 3: Refer to special care to explore the exposure and the source of exposure, and to register
Step 4: Get Baseline testing for ALL exposures.
Step 5: Start PEP if indicated
Step 6: Follow up visits

1.2. Exposure to HIV/AIDS?
1.2.1. What is HIV/AIDS?
HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. HIV attacks and weakens the body’s immune system that is the body’s defense against infections and diseases. When this happens it is possible to become sick. Many people, but not all, may experience symptoms of HIV infection a few days after having been infected – fever, rash and a severe sore throat. These symptoms usually disappear within one or two weeks. Many symptoms of recent HIV infection are easy to overlook as they can be similar to the symptoms of other illnesses. HIV is a highly complicated infection as it can “hide” in your body, and often no symptoms can be seen for many years.

AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is a disease caused by HIV. It is possible to have HIV but not AIDS. Having AIDS means that the immune system is so weak it can no longer fight off a range of infections and diseases. Earlier,those with HIV almost always developed AIDS. But,with advanced medications, people with HIV can be protected from getting AIDS.



1.2.2. How does HIV spread?
HIV can be spread in the following ways:

a. unprotected sex — sex without a condom — withan infected partner/s.
b. drug injection by the sharing of HIV-contaminated needles and syringes;
c. transfusion of blood or blood products contaminated with HIV;
d. from an HIV-infected woman to her baby – during pregnancy at the time of birth, or during breastfeeding


1.2.3. Are the healthcare workers at higher risk for HIV?
The risk of exposure to blood and blood-borne pathogens is slightly greater for health care personnel than for people who do not work around blood.

The HIV exposure types are percutaneous, that can be classified as Less severe (Solid needle, superficial injury) and More Severe (Large-bore, hollow needle, Deep puncture, Visible blood on device, Needle used in artery or vein). Next is mucous membrane and nonintact skin: Small Volume (A few drops) and Large Volume (Large blood splash).

If the source patient has HIV infection, the risk of HIV transmission is approximately 0.3% after a percutaneous exposure, and 0.09% after a mucous membrane exposure.

The risk of infection appears to be higher with:

  • Exposure to a larger quantity of blood or other infectious fluid.
  • Prolonged or extensive exposure of non-intact skin or mucous membrane to blood or other infectious fluid or concentrated virus in a laboratory setting.
  • Exposure to the blood of a patient in an advanced disease stage or with a high viral load.
  • A deep percutaneous injury.
  • An injury with a hollow-bore, blood-filled needle.


1.2.4. How do I know that I have HIV?
The only way to know for sure whether you have HIV is to get tested. Knowing your HIV status gives you powerful information to help you take steps to keep you and your partner healthy. If you test positive, you can take medicine to treat HIV to stay healthy for many years and greatly reduce the chance of transmitting HIV to your sex partner. If you test negative, you have more tools available today to prevent HIV than ever before.


1.2.5. How long after a possible exposure should I wait to get tested for HIV?
It can take some time for the immune system to produce enough antibodies for the HIV test to detect. This time period can vary from person to person. Most people will develop detectable antibodies within two to eight weeks (the average is 20 days to 25 days) of exposure. Even so, there is a chance that some people will take longer to develop detectable antibodies. If the initial negative HIV test was conducted within the first three months after possible exposure, repeat testing should be done at six months.


1.2.6. How to be tested for HIV?
Most HIV tests use a blood sample, either from a blood draw or a finger prick, but some use oral fluid or urine. Tests that use blood are even more accurate than other tests. Test results can be ready within as little as 20 minutes to a few days, depending on the type of test.

HIV tests are very accurate at detecting HIV, but no HIV test can detect HIV immediately after infection. How soon a test can detect infection depends upon different factors, including the type of test being used. In general, nucleic acid tests (NAT) can detect HIV the soonest, followed by combination or fourth generation tests, and then antibody tests.

Most HIV tests, including most rapid tests and home tests, are antibody tests. Antibodies are produced by your immune system when you’re exposed to viruses like HIV and bacteria. Antibody tests look for these antibodies to HIV in your blood or oral fluid. In general, antibody tests that use blood can detect HIV slightly sooner after infection than tests done with oral fluid.

If you use any type of antibody test and have a positive result, you will need to take a follow-up test to confirm your results. If your first test is a rapid home test and it’s positive, you will be sent to a health care provider to get follow-up testing. If your first test is done in a testing lab and it’s positive, the lab will conduct the follow-up testing, usually on the same blood sample as the first test.



1.2.7. What is a window period?
The window period varies from person to person, and is also different depending upon the type of HIV test. Most HIV tests are antibody tests. It takes time for the body to produce enough antibodies for an HIV test to show that a person has HIV. The soonest an antibody test will detect infection is 3 weeks. Most, but not all people will develop detectable antibodies within 3 to 12 weeks of infection.


1.2.8. What do the test results mean?
A positive result means:

  • You are HIV-positive (carrying the virus that causes AIDS).
  • You can infect others and should try to implement precautions to prevent doing so.

A negative result means:

  • No antibodies were found in your blood at this time.

A negative result does NOT mean:

  • You are not infected with HIV (if you are still in the window period).
  • You are immune to AIDS.
  • You have a resistance to infection.
  • You will never get AIDS.


1.2.9. If the test is positive, what does it mean?
Testing positive for HIV means that you now carry the virus that causes AIDS. It does not mean that you have AIDS, nor does it mean that you will die. Although there is no cure for AIDS, many opportunistic infections that make people sick can be controlled, prevented or eliminated. This has substantially increased the longevity and quality of life for people living with AIDS.


1.2.10. What to do when exposed to HIV at workplace?
Step 1: Treat Exposure Site
Step 2: Report and document
Step 3: Refer to special care to explore the exposure and explore the source of exposure
Step 4: Baseline testing for ALL exposures.
Step 5: Immediately start PEP-24-36 hours: A basic 2-drug regimen, appropriate for lower risk exposures
and an expanded 3-drug regimen, for exposures that pose an increased risk for transmission.If information on the source is unknown, and the decision to start PEP is made (based on risk factors, exposure type, etc.), PEP should not be delayed; changes can be made as needed after PEP has been started. If source patient is found to be HIV-negative, PEP should be discontinued. The choice of PEP depends on exposure and also on the source person HIV status and class.

Step 6: Baseline CBC, creatinine, and liver enzyme tests (AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin) should be obtained.

Step 7: Get reevaluated within 72 hours as additional information about the source is obtained.

Step 8: HIV exposure follow-up testing:

-Repeat HIV-antibody testing at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months post exposure.
-If illness compatible with acute retroviral syndrome occurs, perform HIV viral load.
-Extended follow-up (12 months) is recommended for HCP who become infected with HCV following an exposure to a source co-infected with HIV and HCV.

Step 9: Receive post-exposure counselling:refrain from donating blood, plasma, organs, tissue, or semen; to avoid breastfeeding; use methods to prevent pregnancy; and to use risk reduction methods including latex barriers during sex, not sharing injection equipment, and abstaining from risk behaviors.



1.2.11. Is there a Post exposure prophylaxis for HIV?
Yes. PEP is initiated within 24-36 hours of exposure: A basic 2-drug regimen, appropriate for lower risk exposures and an expanded 3-drug regimen, for exposures that pose an increased risk for transmission. If information on the source is unknown, and the decision to start PEP is made (based on risk factors, exposure type, etc.), PEP should not be delayed; changes can be made as needed after PEP has been started. If source patient is found to be HIV-negative, PEP should be discontinued. The choice of PEP depends on exposure and also on the source person HIV status and class.

1.3. Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus


1.3.1. What is Hepatitis B?
Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that ranges in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. It results from infection with the Hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis B can be either “acute” or “chronic.”

Acute Hepatitis B virus infection is a short-term illness that occurs within the first 6 months after someone is exposed to the Hepatitis B virus. Acute infection can — but does not always — lead to chronic infection.

Chronic Hepatitis B virus infection is a long-term illness that occurs when the Hepatitis B virus remains in a person’s body.



1.3.2. How is HBV transmitted?
HBV is transmitted through activities that involve percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin) or mucosal contact with infectious blood or body fluids (e.g., semen, saliva), including Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted through exposure to infective blood, semen, and other body fluids. HBV can be transmitted from infected mothers to infants at the time of birth or from family member to infant in early childhood. Transmission may also occur through transfusions of HBV-contaminated blood and blood products, contaminated injections during medical procedures, and through injection drug use. HBV also poses a risk to healthcare workers who sustain accidental needle stick injuries while caring for infected-HBV patients. A safe and effective vaccine is available to prevent HBV.

HBV is not spread through food or water, sharing eating utensils, breastfeeding, hugging, kissing, hand holding, coughing, or sneezing.



1.3.3. What are the signs and symptoms of HBV infection?
The presence of signs and symptoms varies by age. Most children under age 5 years and newly infected immunosuppressed adults are asymptomatic, whereas 30%–50% of persons aged ≥5 years have initial signs and symptoms. When present, signs and symptoms can include: Fever, Fatigue, Loss of appetite, Nausea, Vomiting, Abdominal pain, Dark urine, Clay-colored bowel movements, Joint pain, Jaundice.

Persons with chronic HBV infection might be asymptomatic, have no evidence of liver disease, or have a spectrum of disease ranging from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (a type of liver cancer).



1.3.4. What is the incubation period for hepatitis B?
Symptoms begin an average of 90 days (range: 60–150 days) after exposure to HBV.


1.3.5. Is there a vaccine for hepatitis B?
Yes. The Hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective and is usually given as 3-4 shots over a 6-month period./expand]

1.3.5.1. What is the Hepatitis B vaccine series? The Hepatitis B vaccine series is a sequence of shots that stimulate a person’s natural immune system to protect against HBV. After the vaccine is given, the body makes antibodies that protect a person against the virus. An antibody is a substance found in the blood that is produced in response to a virus invading the body. These antibodies are then stored in the body and will fight off the infection if a person is exposed to the Hepatitis B virus in the future.


1.3.5.2. Do the health care workers need to be vaccinated against hepatitis B?
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that Health care and public safety workers at risk for exposure to blood or blood-contaminated body fluids be vaccinated against hepatitis B.


1.3.5.3. Is hepatitis B vaccination recommended in certain settings?
Yes, it is recommended in the following settings:

a. In certain health care, evaluation, or treatment settings, a high proportion of clients have known risk factors for HBV infection.
b. Sexually transmitted disease treatment facilities
c. HIV testing and treatment facilities
d. Facilities providing drug-abuse treatment and prevention services
e. Health care settings targeting services to injection drug users
f. Correctional facilities
g. Health care settings targeting services to men who have sex with men
h. Chronic hemodialysis facilities and end-stage renal disease programs
i. Institutions and nonresidential day care facilities for developmentally disabled persons



1.3.5.4. Can hepatitis B vaccine be given after exposure to HBV?
After a person has been exposed to HBV, appropriate prophylaxis, given as soon as possible but preferably within 24 hours, can effectively prevent infection. The mainstay of postexposureimmunoprophylaxis is hepatitis B vaccine, but in certain circumstances the addition of HBIG will provide increased protection.


1.3.6. If I think I have been exposed to the Hepatitis B virus, what should I do?
If you are concerned that you might have been exposed to the Hepatitis B virus, call your health professional or your health department. If a person who has been exposed to Hepatitis B virus gets the Hepatitis B vaccine and/or a shot called “HBIG” (Hepatitis B immune globulin) within 24 hours, Hepatitis B infection may be prevented.


1.3.7. What are the common blood tests available to diagnose Hepatitis B?
There are many different blood tests available to diagnose Hepatitis B. They can be ordered as an individual test or as a series of tests. Ask your health professional to explain what he or she hopes to learn from the tests and when you will get the results. Below are some of the common tests and their meanings. But remember: only your doctor can interpret your individual test results.


1.3.8. How is Hepatitis B treated?
Antiviral agents active against HBV exist. Treatment of HBV infection has been shown to reduce the risk of liver cancer and death. It is estimated that 20–30% of persons with HBV infection could benefit from treatment. However, drugs active against HBV are not widely available or utilized in persons infected with HBV. Currently recommended antiviral agents used for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection do not adequately suppress HBV, which is of great concern for the estimated 10% of the HIV-infected persons in Africa who are co-infected with HBV.


1.3.9. On what factors depend the risk of getting the disease after exposure?
The HBV exposure types are percutaneous, that can be classified as Less severe (Solid needle, superficial injury) and More Severe (Large-bore, hollow needle, Deep puncture, Visible blood on device, Needle used in artery or vein). Next is mucous membrane and nonintact skin: Small Volume (A few drops) and Large Volume (Large blood splash).

If the source patient is Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive AND Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive, the risk of Hepatitis B transmission is approximately 37%-62%. If the source patient is HBsAg-positive and HBeAg-negative, the risk of Hepatitis B transmission is approximately 23%- 37%.

The risk of infection appears to be higher with:

  • Exposure to a larger quantity of blood or other infectious fluid.
  • Prolonged or extensive exposure of non-intact skin or mucous membrane to blood or other infectious fluid or concentrated virus in a
    laboratory setting.
  • Exposure to the blood of a patient in an advanced disease stage or with a high viral load.
  • A deep percutaneous injury.
  • An injury with a hollow-bore, blood-filled needle.


1.3.10. What to do when exposed to HBV?
Step 1: Treat Exposure Site
Step 2: Report and document
Step 3: Refer to special care to explore the exposure and the source of exposure
Step 4: Baseline testing for ALL exposures.
Step 5: HBV PEP should be initiated IMMEDIATELY (preferably within 24 hours but within 7 days). It depends on exposed vaccination status and source HBsAg status.
Step 6:HBV exposure follow-up testing and counseling: Test for anti-HBs 1-2 months after last dose of vaccine; Anti-HBs cannot be ascertained if HBIG given within 6-8 weeks.
Step 7: Receive post-exposure counselling: refrain from donating blood, plasma, organs, tissue, or semen; to avoid breastfeeding; use methods to prevent pregnancy; and to use risk reduction methods including latex barriers during sex, not sharing injection equipment, and abstaining from risk behaviours.


1.3.11. Is there PEP for HBV?
Yes: it depends on the vaccination status of exposed person and the status of the source. The PEP consists of HBV vaccination if the exposed health care worker is unvaccinated and if the source HBsAg is positive, it includes also HBIG. If the exposed health care worker is vaccinated, then it maybe requires no treatment or HBIG, depending on vaccination reaction and source status.


1.3.12. Can I remove the HBV from environmental surfaces?
Any blood spills — including dried blood, which can still be infectious — should be cleaned using 1:10 dilution of one-part household bleach to 10 parts of water for disinfecting the area. Gloves should be used when cleaning up any blood spills.

1.4. Exposure to HCV
1.4.1. What is Hepatitis C, HCV?
Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that ranges in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness that attacks the liver. It results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of an infected person. Hepatitis C can be either “acute” or “chronic.”

Acute Hepatitis C virus infection is a short-term illness that occurs within the first 6 months after someone is exposed to the Hepatitis C virus. For most people, acute infection leads to chronic infection.

Chronic Hepatitis C virus infection is a long-term illness that occurs when the Hepatitis C virus remains in a person’s body. Hepatitis C virus infection can last a lifetime and lead to serious liver problems, including cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) or liver cancer.



1.4.2. How is HCV transmitted?
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is mostly also transmitted through exposure to infective blood. This may happen through transfusions of HCV-contaminated blood and blood products, contaminated injections during medical procedures, and through injection drug use. Sexual transmission is also possible, but is much less common. There is no vaccine for HCV.

Hepatitis C virus is not spread by sharing eating utensils, breastfeeding, hugging, kissing, holding hands, coughing, or sneezing. It is also not spread through food or water.



1.4.3. How is Hepatitis C-HCV treated?
HCV is generally considered to be a curable disease but for many persons this is not a reality. Scientific advances and intense research and development have led to the development of many new oral antiviral drugs for HCV infection. A great number of HCV specific oral drugs are in the late stage of development; some have been recently registered. These are more effective and better tolerated. Much still needs to be done to ensure that these new treatment advances lead to greater access and treatment responses in resource constrained areas of the world./expand]

1.4.4. Is it possible for someone to become infected with HCV and then spontaneously clear the infection? Yes. Approximately 15%–25% of persons clear the virus from their bodies without treatment and do not develop chronic infection; the reasons for this are not well known


1.4.5. How likely is HCV infection to become chronic?
HCV infection becomes chronic in approximately 75%–85% of cases.


1.4.6. What are the signs and symptoms of HCV infection?
The presence of signs and symptoms varies by age. Most children under age 5 years and newly infected immunosuppressed adults are asymptomatic, whereas 30%–50% of persons aged ≥5 years have initial signs and symptoms. When present, signs and symptoms can include: Fever, Fatigue, Loss of appetite, Nausea, Vomiting, Abdominal pain, Dark urine, Clay-colored bowel movements, Joint pain, Jaundice.

Persons with chronic HCV infection might be asymptomatic, have no evidence of liver disease, or have a spectrum of disease ranging from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (a type of liver cancer).



1.4.7. What blood tests are used to detect HCV infection?
Several blood tests are performed to test for HCV infection, including:

a. Screening tests for antibody to HCV (anti-HCV)
b. enzyme immunoassay (EIA)
c. enhanced chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA)
d. Qualitative tests to detect presence or absence of virus (HCV RNA polymerase chain reaction [PCR])
e. Quantitative tests to detect amount (titer) of virus (HCV RNA PCR)



1.4.8. How soon after exposure to HCV can anti-HCV be detected?
HCV infection can be detected by anti-HCV screening tests (enzyme immunoassay) 4–10 weeks after infection. Anti-HCV can be detected in >97% of persons by 6 months after exposure.


1.4.9. How soon after exposure to HCV can HCV RNA be detected by PCR?
HCV RNA appears in blood and can be detected as early as 2–3 weeks after infection.


1.4.10. Is there a vaccine that can prevent Hepatitis C?
Not yet. Vaccines are available only for Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B. Research into the development of a vaccine is under way.


1.4.11. Are the healthcare workers at higher risk for HCV?
The HBV exposure types are percutaneous, that can be classified as Less severe (Solid needle, superficial injury) and More Severe (Large-bore, hollow needle, Deep puncture, Visible blood on device, Needle used in artery or vein). Next is mucous membrane and nonintact skin: Small Volume (A few drops) and Large Volume (Large blood splash).

If the source patient has Hepatitis C (HCV), the risk of Hepatitis C transmission is approximately 1.8% (range 0%-7%).

The risk of infection appears to be higher with:

  • Exposure to a larger quantity of blood or other infectious fluid.
  • Prolonged or extensive exposure of non-intact skin or mucous membrane to blood or other infectious fluid or concentrated virus in a
    laboratory setting.
  • Exposure to the blood of a patient in an advanced disease stage or with a high viral load.
  • A deep percutaneous injury
  • An injury with a hollow-bore, blood-filled needle


1.4.12. What to do when exposed to HCV?
Step 1: Treat Exposure Site
Step 2: Report and document
Step 3: Refer to special care to explore the exposure and the source of exposure
Step 4: Baseline testing for ALL exposures.
Step 5: HCV exposure follow-up testing and counseling: Repeat test for anti-HCV and ALT at least 4-6 months post exposure; confirm repeatedly positive anti-HCV EIA results with supplemental tests. Test for HCV RNA at 4-6 weeks for earlier diagnosis. During follow-up period, refrain from donating blood, plasma, organs, tissue, or semen./expand]

1.4.13. Is there a PEP for HCV? No. At this point, there are no recommendations for HCV PEP. Immuneglobulin is not effective. Exposed HCP should receive appropriate counseling, testing, and follow up. (See HIV Exposures section below.)For seroconverters, pegylated interferon may be effective if started soon after HCV seroconversion.

2. Airborne Exposure

2.1. Exposure to TB
2.1.1. What is TB?
Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs. But TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal.


2.1.2. How is TB transmitted?
TB is spread through the air from one person to another. The bacteria are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected.

However, not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick. People who are infected, but not sick, have what is called latent TB infection. People who have latent TB infection do not feel sick, do not have any symptoms, and cannot spread TB to others. But some people with latent TB infection go on to get TB disease.

People with TB disease can be treated if they seek medical help. Even better, most people with latent TB infection can take medicine so that they will not develop TB disease.



2.1.3. How can I get TB?
You may have been exposed to TB if you spent time near someone with TB disease of the lungs or throat. You can only get infected by breathing in TB germs that a person coughs into the air. You cannot get TB from someone’s clothes, drinking glass, eating utensils, handshake, toilet, or other surfaces where a TB patient has been.


2.1.4. What is latent TB infection?
In most people who breathe in TB bacteria and become infected, the body is able to fight the bacteria to stop them from growing. The bacteria become inactive, but they remain alive in the body and can become active later. This is called latent TB infection. People with latent TB infection:

a. Have no symptoms
b. Don’t feel sick
c. Can’t spread TB bacteria to others
d. Usually have a positive skin test reaction or positive TB blood test
e. May develop TB disease if they do not receive treatment for latent TB infection

Many people who have latent TB infection never develop TB disease. In these people, the TB bacteria remain inactive for a lifetime without causing disease. But in other people, especially people who have weak immune systems, the bacteria become active, multiply, and cause TB disease.



2.1.5. What is TB disease?
If the immune system can’t stop TB bacteria from growing, the bacteria begin to multiply in the body and cause TB disease. The bacteria attack the body and destroy tissue. If this occurs in the lungs, the bacteria can actually create a hole in the lung. Some people develop TB disease soon after becoming infected (within weeks) before their immune system can fight the TB bacteria. Other people may get sick years later, when their immune system becomes weak for another reason.


2.1.6. What are the symptoms of TB disease?
Symptoms of TB disease depend on where in the body the TB bacteria are growing. TB disease in the lungs may cause symptoms such as:

a. A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
b. Pain in the chest
c. Coughing up blood or sputum (phlegm from deep inside the lungs)

Other symptoms of TB disease are:

– Weakness or fatigue
– Weight loss
– No appetite
– Chills
– Fever
– Sweating at night



2.1.7. What shall I do when I was exposed to TB?
If you have been around someone who has TB disease, you should go to your doctor or your local health department for tests. There are two tests that can be used to help detect TB infection: a TB skin test or a TB blood test. Isoniazid preventive therapy might be administered, after the specialist evaluates.


2.1.8. What are the tests for TB?
The TB skin test: The TB skin test may be used to find out if you are infected with TB bacteria. You can get a skin test at the health department or at your doctor’s office. A health care worker will inject a small amount of testing fluid (called tuberculin or PPD) into the skin on the lower part of your arm. After 2 or 3 days, you must return to have your skin test read by the health care worker. You may have swelling where the tuberculin was injected. The health care worker will measure this swelling and tell you if your reaction to the test is positive or negative. A positive reaction usually means that you have been infected by someone with TB disease.

TB blood tests: TB blood tests use a blood sample to find out if you are infected with TB bacteria. The tests measure the response of TB proteins when they are mixed with a small amount of blood. Examples of these TB blood tests include QuantiFERON®-TB Gold in-Tube test (QFT-GIT) and T-Spot® .TB test.



1.1.2. What does the risk of infection after an exposure depends?
2.1.9. What if I am positive for TB infection?

If you have a positive reaction to the TB skin test or TB blood test, your doctor or nurse may do other tests to see if you have TB disease. These tests usually include a chest x-ray. They may also include a test of the sputum you cough up. Because the TB bacteria may be found somewhere other than your lungs, your doctor or nurse may check your urine, take tissue samples, or do other tests. If you have TB disease, you will need to take medicine to treat the disease.



2.1.10. Is TB curable?
It can almost always be treated and cured with medicine. But the medicine must be taken as directed by your doctor or nurse. If you have TB disease, you will need to take several different medicines. This is because there are many bacteria to be killed. Taking several medicines will do a better job of killing all of the bacteria and preventing them from becoming resistantto the medicines.


2.2. Exposure to other airborne diseases
Airborne transmission occurs through very small particles or droplet nuclei that contain infectious agents and can remain suspended in air for extended periods of time. When they are inhaled by a susceptible individual, they enter the respiratory tract and can cause infection. Since air currents can disperse these particles or droplet nuclei over long distances, airborne transmission does not require face-to-face contact with an infected individual. Airborne transmission only occurs with infectious agents that are capable of surviving and retaining infectivity for relatively long periods of time in airborne particles or droplet nuclei. Only a limited number of diseases are transmissible via the airborne route (TB, measles, flu, whooping cough)

If you have been around someone who has TB disease, you should go to your doctor or your local health department for tests. There are two tests that can be used to help detect TB infection: a TB skin test or a TB blood test. Isoniazid preventive therapy might be administered, after the specialist evaluates.

IPConnect is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) | TB CARE II Project implemented by University Research Co., LLC (URC)
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